Archives: Literature


Abstract: Contemporary organizations require a strong learning orientation to gain competitive advantage. Based on in-depth interviews with senior executives and a review of the literature, the present investigation delineates four components of learning orientation: commitment to learning, shared vision, open-mindedness, and intra organizational knowledge sharing. A framework is tested using data from a broad spectrum of US industries. Learning orientation is conceptualized as a second-order construct. Its effect on firm innovativeness, which in turn affects firm performance, is examined. The results generally support theoretical predictions, and some interesting findings emerge.


Paper that defines and describes learning orientation. Used in my article on improving the innovativeness of organisations.
Reading time <1 min
Abstract: The literature reflects remarkably little effort to develop a framework for understanding the implementation of the marketing concept. The authors synthesize extant knowledge on the subject and provide a foundation for future research by clarifying the construct's domain, developing research propositions, and constructing an integrating framework that includes antecedents and consequences of a market orientation. They draw on the occasional writings on the subject over the last 35 years in the marketing literature, work in related disciplines, and 62 field interviews with managers in diverse functions and organizations. Managerial implications of this research are discussed.


Paper that defines market orientation. Referenced in my article on improving the innovativeness of organisations.
Reading time <1 min
Abstract: In this study, we address three research questions: (1) Why are some industrial firms more innovative than others? (2) What effect does innovativeness has on business performance? (3) Does the linkage between innovativeness and business performance depend on the environmental context? Accordingly, we draw on various theoretical perspectives to develop hypotheses that propose market orientation, entrepreneurial orientation, and learning orientation as key antecedents to innovativeness, as well as a direct relationship between innovativeness and business performance. A model is devised and tested that examines these relationships in general and in the context of varying market turbulence. Findings confirm the validity of the model and afford various insights on the role of market turbulence in the proposed relationships. Lastly, implications are offered on the antecedents and consequences of organizational innovativeness.


Paper that shows that Market, Learning and Entrepreneurial orientation are antecedents to innovativeness (which in turn is an antecedent to business performance). Referenced in my article: Increasing the Innovativeness of Organisations
Reading time <1 min
Abstract: This article explores how the concept of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has been portrayed and assessed in prior research. The challenges and decision criteria associated with formative versus reflective measurement approaches are reviewed. It is argued that, as a latent construct, EO exists apart from its measures and that researchers are free to choose whichever measurement approach best serves their research purposes, recognizing that unidimensional versus multidimensional EO measurement models are consistent with fundamentally different conceptualizations of the EO construct. Recommendations are offered regarding potentially appropriate formative and reflective measures of EO.


Reading time <1 min
Abstract: This paper reports the results of a study designed to investigate the effective strategic responses to environmental hostility among small manufacturing firms. Data on environmental hostility, organization structure, strategic posture, competitive tactics, and financial performance were collected from 161 small manufacturers. Findings indicate that performance among small firms in hostile environments was positively related to an organic structure, an entrepreneurial strategic posture, and a competitive profile characterized by a long-term orientation, high product prices, and a concern for predicting industry trends. In benign environments, on the other hand, performance was positively related to a mechanistic structure, a conservative strategic posture, and a competitive profile characterized by conservative financial management and a short-term financial orientation, an emphasis on product refinement, and a willingness to rely heavily on single customers


Defines the Covin/Slevin questionnaire for determining Entrepreneurial Orientation of a firm. Used in article: Increasing The Innovativeness Of Organisations
Reading time <1 min
Definition from 15 identified experts. Pulls out most cited aspects from those definitions, for example 60% having an idea, 13% moving forwards. Proposes a definitive definition of “Executing an idea which addresses a specific challenge and achieves value for both the company and customer”.  
Reading time <1 min
Gives some statistics on innovation such as: 84% of executives agree innovation is important to growth strategy 80% of executives agree that business model are at risk 6% of executives are satisfied with innovation performance Very few executives know what exactly the problem is, and how to improve in innovation and R&D
Reading time <1 min