Archives: Literature


Abstract: The diffusion model developed by Bass (1969) constitutes an empirical generalization. It represents a pattern or regularity that has been shown to repeat over many new products and services in many countries and over a variety circumstances. Numerous and various applications of the model have lead to further generalizations. Modifications and extensions of the model have lead to further generalizations. In addition to the empirical generalizations that stem from the model, we discuss here some of the managerial applications of the model.


Summarises research into coefficients p and q in Bass’ model and gives average, min and max observed values. Takes Rogers’ standard decision based adopter categories and reapplied with this model and practice. Percentages are remarkably close, but there are differences. Especially in innovators: 0.2-2.8% compared to Rogers fixed 2.5%. And in early adopters: 9.5-20% compared […]
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Abstract: Services are fast overtaking manufacturing to form a dominant proportion of the world economy. Service innovation is increasingly seen as a vector of sustainable growth and competitive advantage at the firm-, industry- and economy-level. Innovation started evolving as a key discipline of research over the twentieth century. Initially, innovation research was predominantly focused on science and technology and the new product development approach for commercializing ideas and inventions mainly in the manufacturing industry. With the increasing growth of services in today’s organizations and economy, the importance of understanding service innovation concepts and practices has been on the rise. Over the last two decades, researchers have hence been directing attention to innovation in the context of services. Today, service innovation has evolved into a vast field encompassing the study of intangible processes and dynamic interactions among technological and human systems that lead to managerial and organizational change in services. The literature on service innovation is expanding into a diverse and cross-disciplinary body of knowledge scattered across economics, marketing, organizational science, and management perspectives. The purpose of this chapter is to cut through this complexity and diversity in the streams of extant service innovation literature, and provide a holistic overview of the literature in this rapidly growing field. Organized across three broad themes: Overview of Service Innovation, The Dynamic and Systemic Process of Service Innovation, and Management of Service Innovation; this chapter presents a consolidated guide to the service innovation concepts and practices.


    1 Background 2 Service Innovation: An Overview 2.1 Service Innovation and Its Characteristics 2.2 Classification of Service Innovation 3 The Dynamic and Systemic Process of Service Innovation 3.1 Service Design and New Service Development 3.2 Open and Collaborative Processes of Service Innovation 3.3 Customer as a Co-creator of Service Innovation 3.4 Systemic Diffusion […]
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Abstract: In the unfolding knowledge-based economy, services do matter. But while they are increasingly seen to play a pivotal role in innovation processes, there is little by way of a systematic view of this role. This essay presents a four dimensional model of (services) innovation, that points to the significance of such non-technological factors in innovation as new service concepts, client interfaces and service delivery system. The various roles of service firms in innovation processes are mapped out by identifying 5 basic service innovation patterns. This framework is used to make an analysis of the role played by Knowledge Intensive Business Services (KIBS) in innovation. KIBS are seen to function as facilitator, carrier or source of innovation, and through their almost symbiotic relationship with client firms, some KIBS function as co-producers of innovation. It is further argued that, in addition to discrete and tangible forms of knowledge exchange, process-oriented and intangible forms of knowledge flows are crucial in such relationships. KIBS are hypothesised to be gradually developing into a ‘second knowledge infrastructure’ in addition to the formal (public) ‘first knowledge infrastructure’, though there are liable to be cross-national variations in the spill-over effects from services innovation in and through KIBS, and in the degree to which KIBS are integrated with other economic activities. Finally, some implications for innovation management and innovation policy are discussed.


Contains the 4-dimension model of services innovation. Used in my article https://solvinnov.com/a-modern-services-innovation-framework/   And introduces the fact that KIBS can be facilitators, carriers or sources of innovation
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Abstract: The problem of measuring the impact of advertising dollars on market share is a complex one. This paper describes the four basic types of market share behavior over time. An "Imitation" model is developed to explain serial correlation in the number of new customers buying a brand in each time period. The analysis casts doubt on the feasibility of measuring the impact of advertising expenditures on sales through analyzing aggregative data.


Describes an imitation model to explain when two types of distinct market segments (innovators and imitators) are likely to make a first purchase of a product. This later evolves into Bass' Diffusion model for innovation.
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Abstract: A growth model for the timing of initial purchases of new products is developed and tested empirically against data for eleven consumer durables. The basic assumption of the model is that the timing of a consumer's initial purchase is related to the number of previous buyers. A behavioral rationale for the model is offered in terms of innovative and imitative behavior. The model yields good predictions of the sales peak and the timing of the peak when applied to historical data. A long range forecast is developed for the sales of color television sets.


Develops a growth model and theory for when a consumer makes their first purchase of new consumer products. This is now known better as Bass Diffusion Model. And it helps us with several questions about adoption, such as how many products should we produce per year; what are the true sizes of Rogers adopter types.
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