Archives: Literature


Abstract: Purpose – In the discussion on service-dominant logic and its consequences for value creation and marketing the inner meaning of the value-in-use notion and the nature of service marketing have not been considered thoroughly. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the meaning of a service logic as a logic for consumption and provision, respectively, and explore the consequences for value creation and marketing. Design/methodology/approach – Being a research-based paper, the topic is approached by theoretical analysis and conceptual development. Findings – Discussing the differences between value-in-exchange and value-in-use, the paper concludes that value-in-exchange in essence concerns resources used as a value foundation which are aimed at facilitating customers' fulfilment of value-in-use. When accepting value-in-use as a foundational value creation concept customers are the value creators. Adopting a service logic makes it possible for firms to get involved with their customers' value-generating processes, and the market offering is expanded to including firm-customer interactions. In this way, the supplier can become a co-creator of value with its customers. Drawing on the analysis, ten concluding service logic propositions are put forward. Research limitations/implications – The analysis provides a foundation for further development of a service logic for customers and suppliers, respectively, (“service logic” is preferred over the normally used “service-dominant logic”) as well for further analysis of the marketing consequences of adopting such a business and marketing logic. Practical implications – Marketing practitioners will find new ways of understanding customers' value creation and of developing marketing strategies with an aim to engage suppliers with their customers' consumption processes in order to enhance customer satisfaction. Originality/value – For a scholarly audience, the paper provides a more truly service-centric understanding of value creation and of its marketing consequences. For a practitioner audience, it offers service-based means of further developing marketing practices.


Reading time <1 min
Abstract: Purpose – Noting that resource integration is a pivotal dimension of value co-creation in Service-Dominant logic, this paper aims to explore how service employees engaged in co-creation processes with customers integrate the latter’s resources. Design/methodology/approach – To address the limitations of previous research on customer resources and their integration by service employees, this study turns to the concept of customer participation to identify the nature of customers’ resources. A conceptual framework of their integration by service employees underpins nine key propositions. This foundation leads to the development of theoretical contributions, managerial implications and avenues for research. Findings – Customers can use 12 types of resources in value co-creation. Contrasting with earlier findings, the conceptual framework reveals that service employees may not only integrate these customers’ resources but also either misintegrate or not integrate them. Non-integration and misintegration may be intentional or accidental. Accordingly, value co-creation or co-destruction may result from interactions. Research limitations/implications – This conceptual and exploratory text requires complementary theoretical and empirical investigations. It also does not adopt an ecosystems view of co-creation. Practical implications – Knowing the different steps of resource integration and what influences them should increase the chances of value co-creation and limit the risks of value co-destruction. Originality/value – Scant research has examined the nature of customer resources and how service employees integrate them. This paper also is the first to distinguish among resource integration, misintegration and non-integration.


Amongst other things, a list of customer resources that can be brought to the table informational resources; emotional resources; physical resources; financial resources; temporal resources; behavioral resources; relational resources; social resources; cultural resources; role-related resources (role size, role awareness and role clarity); customer ability; and customer willingness.
Reading time <1 min
Abstract: Drawing on an empirical study of public transport, this paper studies interactive value formation at the provider-customer interface, from a practice-theory perspective. In contrast to the bulk of previous research, it argues that interactive value formation is not only associated with value co- creation but also with value co-destruction. In addition, the paper also identifies five interaction value practices – informing, greeting, delivering, charging, and helping—and theorizes how interactive value formation takes place as well as how value is inter-subjectively assessed by actors at the provider-customer interface. Furthermore, the paper also distinguishes between four types of interactive value formation praxis corresponding with four subject positions which practitioners step into when engaging in interactive value formation.


Reading time <1 min
Abstract: Because of the etymology of the word ‘value’, this article argues that value co-creation research and practice have been biased from their early days. Value co-destruction appears then as a concept that enables to keep some distance from this bias, and to have a better and more realistic understanding of value processes. More research on this topic is thus needed, especially in the rapidly growing context of ecosystems that make the analysis of value co-creation and value co-destruction even more complex. Finally, the article contends that research on co-destruction is a necessary, but not sufficient, step to depart from the etymological bias on value. To that end, it calls for a renewed value-related terminology to make it more encompassing, less biased and closer to real business life.


“It is important to note that value co-destruction can occur for all or just one of the parties involved in an interaction. Thus, value co-destruction may also coexist with value imbalances among interacting actors.”
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Abstract: This study conceptualizes the notion of value co-destruction by reviewing and synthesizing the scattered and scarce value co-destruction literature in interdisciplinary fields. Building on our synthesis, we outline a conceptual framework for the value co-destruction process consisting of three interrelated categories of key concepts. Our framework helps in identifying, analyzing and rectifying unwanted outcomes of a service process and highlighting the dynamic nature of value co-destruction in service systems


Introduces a conceptualised framework for co-destruction of value  
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Abstract: Purpose – Noting that a fundamental tenet of service-dominant (S-D) logic is the co-creation of value-in-use, this paper aims to explore the theoretical possibility that the interactions between service systems cannot only co-create value, but also have adverse consequences leading to actual value co-destruction. Design/methodology/approach – This conceptual paper critically reviews the dominance of value co-creation and value-in-use in S-D logic. Noting the relative lack of research in the converse possibility, the study proposes and explores the implications of value co-destruction as a new concept which should be introduced within the framework of S-D logic. Findings – The study proposes a formal definition for the new proposed concept of value co-destruction. It describes in detail the process by which it occurs, showing that value can be co-destroyed through the interactions between different systems, resulting in value destruction-through-misuse. Indeed, value co-destruction occurs when a service system accidentally or intentionally misuses resources (its own resources and/or those of another service system) by acting in an inappropriate or unexpected manner. Research limitations/implications – This paper is purely conceptual and exploratory. Empirical examination of the theoretical findings regarding value-co-destruction is required. Possible avenues of interest for such empirical research of value co-destruction are suggested. Practical implications – Limiting the occurrence of misuse by aligning the mutual expectations of interacting service systems should reduce the risks of value co-destruction. Recovering from misuse should also be considered. Originality/value – This study is apparently the first to have introduced the notion of value co-destruction into the conceptual framework of S-D logic


“This study is apparently the first to have introduced the notion of value co-destruction into the conceptual framework of S-D logic.”
Reading time <1 min